Biology

Classes

BIOL 101: Anatomy and Physiology I

Class Program
Credits 4

Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL101) is a 4-credit course administered by the Department of Anatomical Sciences at St. George's University, Grenada. BIOL101 is the first in a series of two introductory courses to Anatomy and Physiology, the other being BIOL202. BIOL101 begins with the basic anatomical terminology and building a foundation of cellular physiology, basic histology, and embryology knowledge. The course continues the student's introduction to the structure and function of the human body with a focus on the musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, and digestive systems. The student's basic understanding of the Anatomy and Physiology of the human body will continue to develop throughout the delivery of the course. Students will continue to learn and apply their knowledge of Human Anatomy and Physiology to normal, healthy individuals as well as clinical correlations that are relevant to the health sciences.

BIOL 202: Anatomy and Physiology II

Class Program
Credits 4

This is the second and more advanced portion of this science course on the structure and function of the human body. Through lectures, self-guided study, on-line learning and applied sessions, this course will develop the students theoretical knowledge of the structure and function of the human body inclusive of the cell, tissues, organs, organ systems and accessory structures. The student's basic understanding of the physiological processes which arise from the body's structure will develop throughout the delivery of the course. Students will learn apply their knowledge of anatomy and physiology to normal and a variety of abnormal pathological conditions that are clinically relevant in the practice of medicine.

BIOL 204: Anatomy & Physiol for Nursing

Class Program

This is an integrative course that brings together aspects of cell biology, biochemistry, histology and anatomy to explain the functions of the major human organ systems.  The major organ systems that are explored include the integumentary, skeletal, nervous, muscular, digestive, excretory, cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, lymphatic and reproductive systems.  Laboratory sessions supplement knowledge, acquired in the classroom with hands on experience in tissue histology, gross anatomy and experiments to demonstrate physiological function of the human body.

BIOL 211: Conservation and the Environment

Class Program
Credits 3

This course is an introductory conservation biology course. As such, one of the primary goals of the course is to introduce students to the principles and general concepts of conservation biology. Students enrolled in this course will investigate current theories regarding the ongoing extinction of species. The primary focus of the course will be recent vertebrate extinctions. Students will become intimately acquainted with several species that we have lost (some within the lifetimes of the students) and several additional species that are currently on the verge of extinction. We will also be exploring ecological, educational, philosophical, economic and cultural values that affect human perceptions of conservation and extinction. This course will be intensive in terms of reading, writing, and self-expression. Students will be expected to verbalize their thoughts and observations on assigned readings in classroom discussions. Students will also help each other formulate and bring into focus, what will be their unique philosophical viewpoints on conservation and extinction. Student presentations will center on the basic conservation biology concepts introduced in the course. The formal concepts introduced in this class will be presented by your professors and will be supplemented by group discussions, lab/class activities, and field trips.

BIOL 215: Biology and Diversity of Life

This course is an introductory general biology course for non-science and new science majors. As such, one of the primary goals of the course is to introduce students to the principles and general concepts of biology.

Students will be introduced to some of the methods by which scientists gather information about the living world. Lectures emphasize the science of systematics, taxonomy, classification, nomenclature, genetics, evolution, ecology, and the role of biodiversity in sustainability and conservation of biodiversity.

BIOL 217: Survey of Grenada Wildlife and Habitats

This course is designed to introduce students to the vertebrate wildlife species (both native and non-native) that inhabit the island of Grenada. Students will learn to recognize, by visual and auditory cues as well as by field sign, many of the different species that we share this island with. Students will also learn to recognize the various wildlife habitats found in Grenada and will be able to associate specific vertebrate species with specific habitat. We will also explore conservation issues within Grenada including the complex issues of invasive species management and habitat loss. In addition, students will be developing scientific skills that will include: gathering, interpreting and communicating

BIOL 220: General Biology

This course is designed to complement the Human Biology course so that in tandem, these courses provide a sound foundation for the biology curriculum ahead. It will introduce students to the basic principles of biology. It includes the role of macromolecules in the cell, and cellular structure, organization, and communication. Energy storage via photosynthesis and the harvesting of energy through aerobic respiration will be explored. The cell cycle, meiosis, mitosis, genetics, the molecular basis of inheritance, evolution, and the origin of species will be explored.

BIOL 221: Human Biology

Class Program
Credits 4

Human Biology can be taken in any order, and is designed specifically for students in the preprofessional programs. These courses aim to explain the role of macromolecules in the organization of cells, the compartmentalization of metabolic reactions, and the role of the cell cycle with regards to inheritance.

BIOL 300: Natural Resource Issues

Class Program

This course is an international natural resource and environmental issues course. Students in this course will be investigating historic and current natural resource issues within the Caribbean region and across the globe. Students will explore the philosophical, ecological, cultural, recreational, educational and economic values that affect human perceptions of these complex issues through a series of required readings, in-class discussions and guest and student presentations. Guest speakers will be invited to share their views on particular natural resource issues and to answer questions on these issues from students. Students will also be exposed to Caribbean as well as international environmental legislation, policy and law. Course will emphasize hands-on classroom and field activities.

BIOL 317: Prac Skills for Health Science

Class Program

Practical skills is a primary course taken by undergraduate students which offers key laboratory and transferable skills providing essential knowledge to enable responsible and efficient laboratory working. The course provides an optimum grounding in skills required for subsequent courses such as CHEM 450-Biochemistry and BIOL 321-Molecular Biology. The course will provide students with the knowledge and confidence to undertake laboratory and literature enquiry based learning through guided activities and continued tutor support, assessment and feedback. Assessment will be varied, utilizing a combination of traditional workbooks, online assessments and examinations with an equal focus on the assessment of technical laboratory skills and analysis skills. The transferable nature of the skills taught means this course will be of benefit to any future career path requiring either laboratory or enquiry based research.  Course evaluation data will be collected using Northumbria University online electronic survey system.

BIOL 318: Introduction to Cell Biology

Class Program

The student will study Cell biology; the structure and function of cells and the organelles they contain. This study includes their life cycle, division, self-replication and death processes. The student will develop this knowledge further with the study of Genetics and molecular biology.  In Genetics, the student will study the structure and function of genes and genomes. The Molecular Biology that underpins the manipulation of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA) will form the basis of a lectured material and a practical session. This introduces DNA manipulation and study in the laboratory. The student will then extend this knowledge into the study of the role of genes and mutations in inheritance of disease. This will introduced Clinical Genetics with the identification of genetic mutations and polymorphisms and their influence on disease processes are discussed.

BIOL 319: Introductory Biochemistry

Class Program

Understanding how living systems operate at the molecular level is key to understanding the biochemistry of life. This important field of knowledge is both exciting and dynamic and contributes to all other life sciences such as biomedical sciences, human bioscience, medicine, genetics, nutrition, biology and biotechnology to name but a few. This course will provide students with an important and invaluable introduction biochemistry, namely to the structure and function of the principal molecular components of living systems, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. In addition, the actions and properties of enzymes will be studied. This will provide students with a solid foundation for further study of the molecular basis of living systems.

BIOL 320: Genetics

This is a basic course in Genetics appropriate for Arts and Science students as well as students of Premedical and Pre-Veterinarian studies. Genetics is presented over 16 weeks as part of the discipline-based curriculum in line with the expectations of the St George's University School of Medicine, designed to provide a fundamental basis for understanding Human Genetics pertinent to clinical medicine based on the Genetics Learning Objectives published by the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG). You will be introduced to the language embedded in Medical Genetics and Molecular Biology. These general competencies and specific objectives are described in the ASHG MEDICAL SCHOOL CORE CURRICULUM IN GENETICS. Specifically, this course is designed to introduce you to the fundamental design of DNA leading to the structure and function of the human genome.

You will learn how recent advances in genetic research have led to a greater ability to diagnose and treat many human disease states: 

  • Module 1 - Begins with an introduction to the history of genetics where you will learn how traits are inherited.
  • Module 2 - Begins with understanding how genes are organized within genomic DNA. You will learn of the importance of this organization according to how many copies of a gene are required and their exact location within the genomic DNA.
  • Module 3 - You will learn how genes are expressed.
  • Module 4 - You will learn about linking the information that is found in an organism's DNA and how it is related to the way an organism looks and behaves, also known as "Genotype to Phenotype".

A basic understanding of chemistry, biology, and physics will be assumed.

BIOL 321: Molecular Biology

This upper-division course is designed to help students develop an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that biological organisms use to store and preserve genetic information, the means by which they use that information to create functional biological structures, and the techniques that are commonly used to manipulate and study these processes in the laboratory. A basic understanding of chemistry, biology, genetics, and biochemistry will be assumed.

BIOL 321/BIOL 331: Molecular Biology/Molecular Biology Laboratory

Class Program
Credits 4

This upper-division course is designed to help students develop an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that biological organisms use to store and preserve genetic information, the means by which they use that information to create functional biological structures, and the techniques that are commonly used to manipulate and study these processes in the laboratory. A basic understanding of chemistry, biology, genetics, and biochemistry will be assumed.

BIOL 331: Molecular Biology Lab

Class Program
Credits 1

The goal of the accompanying laboratory sessions is to help students to develop an understanding of the study of molecular biology in the laboratory; develop an understanding of the technical limitations and potential errors that can be encountered in the laboratory; develop an understanding of the scientific method and the source of the facts studied in lectures; and develop the ability to interpret, organize, and present scientific information.

BIOL 344: Cell and Developmental Biology

Introduction to animal development emphasizing vertebrate embryo, mechanisms governing morphogenesis and cell and tissue differentiation. The course covers topics ranging from microscopy, cell cycle, cell labeling techniques, gametogenesis (formation of sperm and eggs), organogenesis (formation of tissues), and evolution. The material is comparative using examples from both invertebrates and vertebrate model systems. The student will be provided with a foundation of classical embryology (embryo anatomy) while focusing on differential gene expression as the driving force that shapes an embryo. Topics of interest to society including human infertility, human birth defects, assisted reproductive technologies and embryonic stem cells will be included in the curriculum.

BIOL 400: Ecological Field Studies

Class Program

This capstone, field-based course will provide students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge of ecology and scientific research methods, to a current ecological research question on the island of Grenada or in the seas surrounding the island.  Students will take the lead in the design, implementation and completion of an ecological field research project. Students will work together as a "scientific" team and will present their findings (written and/or oral), as a group, in a professional setting.

BIOL 401: Microbiology

This course is a 4-credit course for premed, prevet, Foundation to Veterinary Medicine, and Biology, Ecology, and Conservation students. It is taught over 16 weeks in two 75-minute weekly sessions.

 

Major components of the course are lectures, practical laboratories, quizzes, online activities/assignments, and self-study.

 

The aim of the course is to introduce you to the topic of microbiology. By looking at the basic characteristics and interactions of microorganisms with their environments, you will obtain an overall understanding of their beneficial and harmful contributions to ecosystems and human colonization. This exposure to the disciplines of bacteriology, mycology, virology, and immunology is intended to serve as a basis for understanding microorganisms and microbial processes (Life Sciences/Biology) and as a foundation for more in-depth future studies (pre-professional programs).

BIOL 407: Senior Internship

Class Program

The capstone junior/senior internship for marine biology and wildlife & conservation biology students provides an opportunity for these students to utilize their field skills and their newly acquired knowledge in a professional working environment.

BIOL 420: Capstone I

Class Program

This capstone course will allow students to develop an independent enquiry-based research project where students apply the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program, while being mentored by a faculty member. Students will be tasked with formulating a research question and testable hypotheses, review relevant literature, develop a research design and methods, and present a written and oral research design to a committee.

BIOL 421: Capstone II

Class Program

This capstone course will allow students to implement an independent enquiry-based  research  project where students apply the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program, while being mentored by a faculty member. Students will be tasked with executing the research proposal developed in capstone I, collecting and analyzing data, and presenting a written, oral  and poster presentation to a committee.

BIOL 441: Physiology

Class Program
Credits 4

Human Physiology (BIOL 441) is a 4-credit course presented over 16 weeks as part of the discipline-based preclinical Science curriculum of St George's University School of Medicine. It is designed to provide a fundamental basis for understanding human physiology pertinent to clinical medicine based on the Medical Physiology Learning Objectives published by the American Physiological Society (APS). It is one of the final prerequisite courses for the third-year preclinical Sciences and Biology students, and a central component of the Charter Foundations to Medicine program. The course uses a variety of instructional approaches to facilitate learning using lectures, quizzes, interactive multiple choice question sessions, and small group clinical discussions.

Course topics teaching the essential elements, concepts, and organ systems in human physiology are delivered across four consecutive blocks:

Module Name

  • Block1—(CTP) Cell and Tissue Physiology: Homeostasis, Excitable tissue, and Intro to Nervous System (4 weeks)
  • Block2—(S1) System: Neurophysiology, Autonomic Nervous, and Cardiovascular Systems (4 weeks)
  • Block3—(S2) System: Gastrointestinal and Pulmonary Systems (4 weeks)
  • Block4—(S3) System: Endocrine and Renal Systems (4 weeks) Total 16 Weeks